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MS509 – Cell Biology – (3 credits)

Cell biology is an ever-growing field that represents the convergence of three scientifically distinct fields: biochemistry, genetics/molecular biology and physiology. Modern cell biology is the study of what components make up the cell, how they got there and what they do, which includes the study of how cells interact with each other. In this course, you will learn the basics of cell structure and function, modern investigative techniques used in the cell biology laboratory and have exposure to the practical application of cell biology concepts. This is a required, three-credit course for students enrolled in the Master of Biomedical Sciences program


MS527 – Management – (1 credit)

This course provides students with an introduction to the dynamic world of business and leadership. The goal is to peruse the concepts of business ethics, communication, decision making, diversity, leadership, professionalism, social responsibility and team performance, all through the lens of the traditional theories and models of organizational behavior.


MS506 – Seminars in Biomedical Science – (1 credit)

The purpose of this course is to develop student ability to critically evaluate and to utilize the primary scientific literature in their professional studies. It will give students the opportunity and experience of working in groups and educating their peers. In each class meeting, a research paper from the primary scientific literature will be presented by a group of students in an approximately 50-minute period (40 to 45-minute presentation, 5-10 minutes for questions). The students, who may confer with the course director during the preparation, will prepare a PowerPoint presentation. Each presentation represents an opportunity to educate your classmates on important research in biomedical science relevant to your course work in the program and to assist them in developing the skills necessary to understand and evaluate the scientific literature. The students in the course are expected to take an active part in the discussion during and following each presentation.


MS590 – Laboratory Rotations – (3 credits)

This is a required core course in the PSM Program. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to conduct laboratory experiments under the direct supervision of a faculty member at a biotechnology company. The primary objective of this course is to assist students in choosing a mentor, thesis topic, externship/internship location and completing thesis research. Students in this course are required to take three 3-week rotations in a minimum of two independent laboratories/biotech companies. Mentor expectations and grading criteria should be communicated between the mentor and student at the start of the rotation and approved by the course director. Students will be required to submit a written report that includes a description of the research, experiments attempted, interpretations, accomplishments, etc., along with a Student Evaluation Report form completed by the faculty mentor. Additionally, the student is expected to present a summary of this work during the scheduled presentation sessions after all rotations are complete.


MS529 – Bioethics – (1 credit)

Bioethics is a one-credit course for students enrolled in the Master in Biomedical Sciences (MBS) program or PSM Program. This course meets two hours per week in the summer semester for eight weeks. The course will serve as an introduction to bioethics. Topics to be explored include scientific integrity (e.g. research with animals, research with humans including vulnerable populations, conflicts of interest, publication) and medical ethics (e.g. key issues facing geneticists, pediatricians, psychiatrists and geriatricians including genomics, precision medicine, autonomy and end-of-life transitions). Methodology used in the analysis and evaluation of contemporary bioethical issues will be emphasized. The course will be taught through a combination of didactic presentations, podcasts, active learning in the form of team-based learning and topic presentations by student groups.


MS503 – Epi and Biostats – (3 credits)

This course provides a broad introduction to the principles and methods of epidemiology and the basics of biostatistics, with particular emphasis on the role of these core disciplines in public health practice and research. In this course, students learn about the basic epidemiological and biostatistical concepts and tools applied in public health practice and population-based research. Students gain the knowledge required to appropriately interpret epidemiological and statistical data, to determine appropriate study design and methods for epidemiological and clinical studies, and to critically review the clinical and public health research literature. The influence of sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle factors on disease risk and mortality are also discussed. Finally, students will gain an introductory understanding of how epidemiologic methods are applied using R, a powerful statistical programming tool that is popular among many professional researchers.


MS504 – Human Genetics – (3 credits)

Human Genetics is a three-credit course that meets for 15 weeks of instruction that is designed to educate students in classical and molecular genetics, particularly as it applies to the understanding of inherited human disorders.  Major topics covered in this course will include: Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, multifactorial inheritance, developmental genetics, and cancer genetics. Sections discussing molecular biology, cytoplasmic inheritance, RNA regulation of the genome, and epigenetics are also included in the course. This course will incorporate case-based learning modules to aid in discussion of the above material


MS589 – Journal Club – (1 credit)

This is a required, one-credit course for students enrolled in the PSM program. This course is designed to develop scientific communication skills with a focus on reading and interpreting scientific manuscripts and scientific public speaking. Scientific philosophy, critical thinking and the use of online databases to access the primary literature will be introduced to students. Key communication skills will be developed in these courses including: thinking and conversing competently in the language of science, oral presentation, critiquing the scientific literature and understanding the mechanics of writing scientific manuscripts. 


MS591 – Thesis Research I – (4 credits)

This is a required core course in the PSM program. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to conduct independent laboratory research that can be used toward their thesis under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The primary objective of this course is to conduct required research that is meant to be the basis of the student’s thesis project. Mentor expectations and grading criteria should be communicated between the mentor and student at the start of the research and approved by the course director. Students will be required to submit a written report that includes a description of the research, experiments attempted, interpretations, accomplishments, etc., along with a Student Evaluation Report form completed by the faculty mentor. This research will be part of the thesis process and the student is expected to continue this research under MS592 and MS593 to prepare a poster and thesis project following the conclusion of this work.


MS592 – Thesis Research II – (8 credits)

This is a required core course in the PSM program. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to conduct independent laboratory research that can be used toward their thesis under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The primary objective of this course is to conduct required research that is meant to be the basis of the student’s thesis project. Mentor expectations and grading criteria should be communicated between the mentor and student at the start of the research and approved by the course director. Students will be required to submit a written report that includes a description of the research, experiments attempted, interpretations, accomplishments, etc., along with a Student Evaluation Report form completed by the faculty mentor. This research will be part of the thesis process and the student is expected to continue this research under MS593 to prepare a poster and thesis project following the conclusion of this work.


MS593 –Thesis Research III – (8 credits)

This is a required core course in the PSM program. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to conduct independent laboratory research that can be used toward their thesis under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The primary objective of this course is to conduct required research that is meant to be the basis of the student’s thesis project. Mentor expectations and grading criteria should be communicated between the mentor and student at the start of the research and approved by the course director. Students will be required to submit a written report that includes a description of the research, experiments attempted, interpretations, accomplishments, etc., along with a Student Evaluation Report form completed by the faculty mentor. 


MS594 – Thesis Writing/Defense – (6 credits)

This is a required core course in the PSM program. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to complete independent laboratory research if necessary and prepare a thesis and poster under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The primary objective of this course is to complete thesis project and poster and present this work to the student’s advisory committee.

A career in research that starts now

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